Drills…..it’s not how good they are,it’s how you use them!

One of my most “successful” – most viewed, liked and shared – activities was published on the Twenty20 Facebook page recently. The batting bleep test.

HOW IT WORKS:
Players work in pairs – 1 batter and 1 feeder (drop feeds)
Each player hits 6 balls (aiming at small straight drive target) before switching over
BALL 1 – Player 1 hits ball. Player 2 has 10 seconds to collect ball, and be ready for the next shot
BALL 2 – Player 1 hits the ball AND runs to the end of the hall and back. Player 2 collects the ball as usual. Again, they have 10 seconds to be ready for the next ball
BALL 3 – HIT
BALL 4 – HIT AND RUN
BALL 5 – HIT
BALL 6 – HIT AND RUN
END OF OVER – players have 5 extra seconds to swap roles. The game repeats.

Why this one?!

Now….it’s great to do something that’s so popular! But why this one?! Many other posts I have written, that i feel more proud of, get eclipsed by others like this.

What does the success of this kind of post tell us about coaches? Perhaps we are keen for the “quick fix”? An activity that will instantly produce results? Unfortunately it rarely works like that.

The dilemma of the coaching blogger: If this sort of post goes viral why not create more like them?!

Because the drill is only 10% of the job! 

How to make it work? 

Each drill has its advantages and flaws. Each drill can be used in different ways.

Everyone will get better at a drill if they repeat it enough. But that means nothing in itself. Have they developed toold to APPLY THEM?? This is where the coach comes in….

Amid all the likes, shares and positive comments….one person stood out: in criticism! 

“Now then, i don’t like that drill, but I guess you lot do…..

….the quality especially gets lost in the rush to complete it”.

After recovering from the initial dent to the ego (easy to get carried away by praise!!)…..I was grateful for this dose of honesty. On analysis, there are big holes to be found.

Criticisms

deando ruxley
Does what we do in training always apply to the real world?
  • Shots are poorly executed – in a rush and off-balance
  • Running is not done with the appropriate technique (as much as it should)
  • Not enough technical input during the drill

Conclusion: in itself, this drill would be disastrous!

So was there any point in it at all? Is it broken from the beginning?

No. And this is why….

Turning the negatives into a positive…

….or more accurately, a learning experience! 

The correct way to use this drill: as a gateway to discussing a finer aspect of the game.

  1. OBSERVE – allow the players to find a methodsnasy-practice
  2. USE QUESTIONS – to identify what made the drill either easier or more difficult
  3. EXPLAIN – the key to success in this drill: efficiency. In the LONG RUN, sound technique and attention to detail prevailed.

It became apparent that pairs who were giving themselves more time for each shot, were far more successful than those who were scrambling to be ready. However, this is only achieved by:

  • ATTENTION TO DETAIL – correct shots minimizing effort to retrieve the ball
  • GOOD RUNNING TECHNIQUE – thus saving time and distance covered….every calorie counts!!

We now had undeniable evidence to the players. It was in their interest to.

  1. Take care over the shot – thus no need to chase the ball across the hall
  2. Run earnestly – and with a good technique (running and on the turn)

Going beyond technique

Even the best technique in the universe needs to be EXECUTED. In order for this to happen, technique is just one part of the puzzle.

Other qualities that are VITAL include:

  1. TEMPO CONTROL – when the going gets tough, will you choose the right moments to speed up, and the right moments to slow down
  2. PREPARATION – use the time available to get into the position, and temperament, that will help the shot
  3. ENDURANCE – managing precision under fatigue. This requires a mental endurance as well as physical. For the shot to be right, the mind needs to convince the body to keep doing it properly!

The reason I enjoyed this drill, was that I was able to examine how young players responded to pressure….in this case, time restrictions.

How did they cope with a setback or bad luck (eg/ other pairs in the way, or a deflection off he wall). All part of the game….but did it affect them?

When was their “tipping point” into laziness. Were they sharp enough to save every possible split second? And even if they were, did they then use that time wisely?

Were they consistent, efficient and calm from start to finish?

Use your drills properly….and adapt them!

I am often surprised at many coaches’ lack of nuance. Activities are either “rated” as good or bad. Glorified or dismissed. There is less awareness that a good drill can produce bad results, or a mundane drill can be elevated or adapted. 

Very often, we are lulled into thinking that a drill “speaks for itself”. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The input – what you choose to say and when – is crucial to its success.

ALWAYS PICK A THEME – and be consistent with it. Don’t be in a rush to fix everything at once
ALWAYS HAVE VARIATIONS – Massed practice is crucial at times. But sometimes, leave in a bit of potential for chaos/randomness. Some drills can be overly controlled and formulaic….almost completely sanitized from the on-field experience.
DON’T BE AFRAID OF FAILURE – use these moments as a chance to explain wider truths about cricket. Mentality, clear thinking and consistency in applying these two (regardless of the situation). Seeing how they respond to mix-ups can tell you a lot.

We forget that it’s not WHAT you do, it’s HOW you do it!